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I really look forward to all of your products being able to work on the verizon Network..This will mean a definite sale for 5 of my business lines..

But as well to many other Verizon Members..

Any idea when your programmers will make your software totally compatiable with CDMA networks (verizon) and not just GSM (t-mboile & At&t)??

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I really look forward to all of your products being able to work on the verizon Network..This will mean a definite sale for 5 of my business lines..

But as well to many other Verizon Members..

Any idea when your programmers will make your software totally compatiable with CDMA networks (verizon) and not just GSM (t-mboile & At&t)??

This service isn't availableto Verizon lines?

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I really look forward to all of your products being able to work on the verizon Network..This will mean a definite sale for 5 of my business lines..

But as well to many other Verizon Members..

Any idea when your programmers will make your software totally compatiable with CDMA networks (verizon) and not just GSM (t-mboile & At&t)??

I assume you are referring to the Intercept Call feature of Pro-X.

Just so everybody reading this understands, our products are compatible with ALL carriers. The only requirements are that you have a supported phone and a proper Internet connection from the Target. Now, the only feature that doesn't work on CDMA is the Intercept Call feature of Pro-X. In the States, Verizon and Sprint are CDMA networks.

Intercept Call is the ability to patch into live conversations happening on the Target. SpyCall (Pro) is remote listening (conversations in the room, etc) and does work just fine on CDMA. The reason Intercept Call doesn't work on CDMA is because it relies on call conferencing, or 3-way calling as a network service. CDMA networks handle conferencing in a different way than GSM. For some reason, CDMA networks lose the Caller ID information from the 3rd call (your Intercept Call) when the first two lines are already connected (the conversation you want to Intercept). Because of this, when you place the Intercept Call the phone is unable to recognize that its the Monitor number calling, so the program can't know when to make the Intercept occur.

Unpredictable things might happen in this case, and we wouldn't want to do anything that can't be controlled as intended. On a Blackberry its very easy to see how this happens with just two calls. Take a Blackberry and have someone call it. While holding that conversation, have a 2nd number call and beep in. You'll see the Call Waiting flash to show you the 2nd incoming number. Answer the 2nd call and the first will be on hold. While connected to the 2nd line, look at the Caller ID to see if its reported the correct 2nd number, or if its still showing the original line 1 number. Now flip back to the original call and make sure the 2nd call disconnects. Look at the Caller ID again. It might say "Unknown" or it might still show the Caller ID of that 2nd call that already hung up. Maybe it does show the correct number for line 1, if that number was still showing incorrectly after you answered line 2. Now have another number call and beep in on the 2nd line again. Does the Call Waiting display the proper number of line 2, the second time that line 2 beeps in?

If you play with this a little bit you'll see what I mean. The Caller ID doesn't remain consistent after two different numbers have connected to the same phone during the same call. And that's exactly what an Intercept Call is, a 3rd call coming in after two others have already connected. We haven't fully tested this with Symbian and Windows Mobile as it requires recoding for CDMA, but we know that CDMA networks seem to have a kind of bug that is clearly demonstrated in normal use.

There may be some way to get around this, or maybe it could work differently with Windows Mobile, for example. But there are a lot of proprietary things a developer doesn't have access to when writing software, such as the way a phone processes call waiting and caller ID internally. Some of it is trade secrets, or just not available for public development. GSM is a world standard for cell phone technology, while CDMA is mostly confined to North America, so there is a lot more that is known about developing for technology that conforms to world standards. With GSM, the phone is in control of most of its functions. CDMA phones may be powerful but the network is really controlling most of what happens, while the phone only takes instructions. Not that CDMA isn't important, the sheer subscriber base makes it potentially our largest market. But if you want Intercept Call, you'll need to switch to a GSM Target (ATT/T-Mobile) for now.

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  • 3 weeks later...

what about the new sprint blackberry 8830 world edition. it says it can run off cdma OR gsm. in order for it (call intercept) to work on this phone, you'd have to be in a gsm only area? or what? whats the deal with that?

We do support the 8830, but there are a couple of things you should be aware of. First, there is a problem with all such "dual mode" models. You see, in order for the phone to support both GSM and CDMA, it has to be compliant for both technologies. Its not only a difference in operating frequencies. This means that even if you are using a dual mode device on a GSM network, it will still have the same functionality of a CDMA phone built into it, and that's the problem.

Regarding the CDMA issue with Intercept Call and Call Waiting previously explained, we have found that the Storm 2 (9550) behaves the same way even when operating on GSM. It has to use the same CDMA way of joining the two lines, or it wouldn't work when used on a CDMA network. And you'll notice that the 9550 is not listed on our page of supported phones under the Blackberry Pro-X category. The 9500 and 9530 are listed, but these Storm models are not dual mode. Well, 9550 also carries OS 5.0, which we don't yet support, so that's another reason.

At present I notice the 8830 is listed on our Pro-X supported phones page, but I'm not sure why and I'm going to look into this. For sure the Intercept Call won't work for any model if being used on CDMA anyway, but the point is that the CDMA method of Caller ID and joining two lines in a conference call is what isn't compatible, so any phone that does this (including dual mode models) is probably going to have the same problem. Please double-check our pages of supported phones before actually purchasing a model with FlexiSPY in mind.

There is also a known issue with the SpyCall function on 8830/8330. We thought we fixed it but I think we're going to have to release another update for this. I would wait for our next update release if you're considering that model. Updates are always announced in the NEWS section of our Support Center at http://support.flexispy.com

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and what about the iden network? does the call intercept work on that?

I think you are probably talking about Push-To-Talk (PTT) or Direct Talk models. I'm not sure if we have any customers on an iDEN-only network, but it may be irrelevant because we only develop for phone platforms and compatible models, not individual networks. If you don't see any iDEN models listed on our page of supported phones then that answers the question. Generally it never matters what network you're using, only that we publish the model as supported. Having said that, I'm not aware of any Intercept Call issues with iDEN, but I'm not aware of any supported models running on the Nextel/iDEN network.

Blackberry phones that were made specifically for the Nextel/iDEN network all have an "i" in front or behind the model number. We don't list any "i" models as supported. However, Sprint just very recently (a few days ago) pushed out an OS 5.0 update over the air to some of its Blackberry models. Along with the 5.0 update some non-i series models became instantly PTT compatible. The update allows a programmable button to become the PTT button. Pretty nifty, and it could be for a model we support. However, we still don't yet support BB OS 5.0. But we will soon. Keep an eye on the NEWS section of our Support Center. The News updates are also automatically updated in the News and Announcements section of this forum.

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can we start a pre paid section in this forum? lots of people are ONLY prepaid, and i have found it very difficult to find a phone with everything compatible....but im still working on it. could be a big help to others. i know my target won't/can't get a contract phone, so this could be important for others with similar targets.

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Christian,

Thanks for all of your information.

Based on what you said, Does the flexispy light software enable the monitoring of SMS text messages on a CDMA device? I'm interested in purchasing software for a LG Voyager on the Verizon network. I'd like to monitor text messages and emails. If this is possible with the Flexispy light package, which would I order? Symbian? Windows Mobile?

Thanks for all of your help

I assume you are referring to the Intercept Call feature of Pro-X.

Just so everybody reading this understands, our products are compatible with ALL carriers. The only requirements are that you have a supported phone and a proper Internet connection from the Target. Now, the only feature that doesn't work on CDMA is the Intercept Call feature of Pro-X. In the States, Verizon and Sprint are CDMA networks.

Intercept Call is the ability to patch into live conversations happening on the Target. SpyCall (Pro) is remote listening (conversations in the room, etc) and does work just fine on CDMA. The reason Intercept Call doesn't work on CDMA is because it relies on call conferencing, or 3-way calling as a network service. CDMA networks handle conferencing in a different way than GSM. For some reason, CDMA networks lose the Caller ID information from the 3rd call (your Intercept Call) when the first two lines are already connected (the conversation you want to Intercept). Because of this, when you place the Intercept Call the phone is unable to recognize that its the Monitor number calling, so the program can't know when to make the Intercept occur.

Unpredictable things might happen in this case, and we wouldn't want to do anything that can't be controlled as intended. On a Blackberry its very easy to see how this happens with just two calls. Take a Blackberry and have someone call it. While holding that conversation, have a 2nd number call and beep in. You'll see the Call Waiting flash to show you the 2nd incoming number. Answer the 2nd call and the first will be on hold. While connected to the 2nd line, look at the Caller ID to see if its reported the correct 2nd number, or if its still showing the original line 1 number. Now flip back to the original call and make sure the 2nd call disconnects. Look at the Caller ID again. It might say "Unknown" or it might still show the Caller ID of that 2nd call that already hung up. Maybe it does show the correct number for line 1, if that number was still showing incorrectly after you answered line 2. Now have another number call and beep in on the 2nd line again. Does the Call Waiting display the proper number of line 2, the second time that line 2 beeps in?

If you play with this a little bit you'll see what I mean. The Caller ID doesn't remain consistent after two different numbers have connected to the same phone during the same call. And that's exactly what an Intercept Call is, a 3rd call coming in after two others have already connected. We haven't fully tested this with Symbian and Windows Mobile as it requires recoding for CDMA, but we know that CDMA networks seem to have a kind of bug that is clearly demonstrated in normal use.

There may be some way to get around this, or maybe it could work differently with Windows Mobile, for example. But there are a lot of proprietary things a developer doesn't have access to when writing software, such as the way a phone processes call waiting and caller ID internally. Some of it is trade secrets, or just not available for public development. GSM is a world standard for cell phone technology, while CDMA is mostly confined to North America, so there is a lot more that is known about developing for technology that conforms to world standards. With GSM, the phone is in control of most of its functions. CDMA phones may be powerful but the network is really controlling most of what happens, while the phone only takes instructions. Not that CDMA isn't important, the sheer subscriber base makes it potentially our largest market. But if you want Intercept Call, you'll need to switch to a GSM Target (ATT/T-Mobile) for now.

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can we start a pre paid section in this forum? lots of people are ONLY prepaid, and i have found it very difficult to find a phone with everything compatible....but im still working on it. could be a big help to others. i know my target won't/can't get a contract phone, so this could be important for others with similar targets.

I know many people subscribe to pre-paid mobile accounts, but we do not have so many pre-paid customers. Perhaps it is for reasons beyond our control. Whether prepaid or not, our software requirements don't change. You simply need a supported device with a valid internet connection. Many prepaid accounts only offer WAP internet access, not GPRS, or some no internet at all. However if you find a prepaid account that allows unrestricted Internet access, this is all that is required.

As long as you have the right Internet access, there should not be many pre-paid specific issues. However one thing you may run into is that some prepaid services will send an SMS to the Target confirming the remaining credit, after every billable event. This would include SMS responses to the commands you send, or Internet connections for reporting the data to the server. Both the Symbian and Windows Mobile product include a keyword deletion filter, so that such network SMS will be deleted upon arrival. However, there is nothing we can do to actually prevent these messages from being sent by the network.

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Christian,

Thanks for all of your information.

Based on what you said, Does the flexispy light software enable the monitoring of SMS text messages on a CDMA device? I'm interested in purchasing software for a LG Voyager on the Verizon network. I'd like to monitor text messages and emails. If this is possible with the Flexispy light package, which would I order? Symbian? Windows Mobile?

Thanks for all of your help

Brik,

We don't develop for specific models, only for Operating System platforms. These are currently Windows Mobile, Symbian, Blackberry, iPhone and Android. The specific model must be found on our pages of PHONES from the main web site www.flexispy.com, or it can't be supported. The only exception is Windows Mobile, for which we support most standard WM series phones. The Voyager does not belong to any of these Operating System platforms, and runs its own proprietary OS instead.

Please always check our PHONES page from www.flexispy.com to check for any specific model. These pages list all supported models and your Target model MUST be referenced on these pages.

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christian i am aware that its got to be unlimited data/internet, thats one of the most obvious things.

see christian, even after i thought it all figured out, theres another catch. i don't know anything about wap and gprs, and i have been researching spyphone apps for prepaid phones for months!!! we DO need a prepaid section becuase its not as easy as you make it sound. first of all, hardly any prepaid services will even let you use a smart phone, and the ones that do seem to all have catches. there are a few major wireless companies that do have smartphone prepaid plans, like boost, has an unlimited plan, (boost doesn't actually have any smart phones besides their blackberry, but there are ways of putting sprint and nextel phones on boost unlimited) and also a blackberry unlimited plan. and when they say unlimted, thats what they mean. i thought i was set to go, then i find out call intercept doesn't work with cdma. so theres another catch. now i am researching gsm companies for an unlimited smart phone plan. can you tell me then, even if it says unlimited everything, talk text data 24/7 it still could be the wap internet? and then what is the difference between wap and gprs?

all im saying is the ALL the spyphone companies make it seem like all you have to do is have a smart phone and buy the package you want. and that is what i thought at first. but no, some apps are only compatible with certain phones, and its got to be this, and this and this and this, but even if you have all those, this feature may not work etc etc etc....if it werent for this forum, and a few other underground forums i found, id have bought the software and it wouldn't have worked. it would have been nice if i could have said (months ago), i want spyware app for a prepaid service. can you recomend a major carrier and phone that are both compatible? but you guys don't have that answer. maybe i'll tell spyphoneguy to do an artical on prepaid phones.

I know many people subscribe to pre-paid mobile accounts, but we do not have so many pre-paid customers. Perhaps it is for reasons beyond our control. Whether prepaid or not, our software requirements don't change. You simply need a supported device with a valid internet connection. Many prepaid accounts only offer WAP internet access, not GPRS, or some no internet at all. However if you find a prepaid account that allows unrestricted Internet access, this is all that is required.

As long as you have the right Internet access, there should not be many pre-paid specific issues. However one thing you may run into is that some prepaid services will send an SMS to the Target confirming the remaining credit, after every billable event. This would include SMS responses to the commands you send, or Internet connections for reporting the data to the server. Both the Symbian and Windows Mobile product include a keyword deletion filter, so that such network SMS will be deleted upon arrival. However, there is nothing we can do to actually prevent these messages from being sent by the network.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Actually, I think it is a fairly simple set of requirements, but you may be getting lost in the details of all the various service plans different networks offer.

It is true there are many different plans available, and these can change at any time. However our requirements never change and are rather standard for any given network. These requirements are simply:

- that you are using a supported model phone

- For Blackberry: have a Blackberry data plan with BIS connection (this is a standard Blackberry data plan)

- On GSM network: have service plan which includes GPRS access point for Internet service (not restricted to WAP only)

- On CDMA network: a standard internet data plan

On GSM, WAP access point (or APN) is generally for basic browsing only, although there may be some media streaming or additional WAP services available on some networks. Regardless, you may have to sign up for or separately request GPRS access on some GSM networks. GPRS is the standard internet access point for GSM networks, which can use all standard internet communication ports (as opposed to the limited ports for basic service that WAP uses).

Generally CDMA does not use access points (either WAP or GPRS), but has its own protocol for direct Internet access. In the case of CDMA you simply need to sign up for a data plan that includes CDMA Internet access. A CDMA network may or may not have its own GPRS access point on the network, but if so this is usually just for roaming and isn't required.

All of these details are related to the different options available from the service plans, but have nothing to do directly with the software requirements. Any plan that offers a direct, unrestricted data plan on a supported model should work just fine. The details of the different plans will have more to do with cost, amount of data included per month, etc. Usually the most economic is to just get an unlimited data (or unlimited "everything") plan, but this will vary from network to network.

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